Applying the Rule of Law to Fix San Francisco’s Tenderloin District

San Francisco’s Tenderloin District has faced longstanding challenges related to drug use, crime, and homelessness. Despite efforts to address these issues, the district continues to struggle with illegal drug markets, public health hazards, and social disorder. San Francisco’s approach, which has focused on social justice ideas and initiatives with minimal consequences for illegal activities, has failed to yield significant improvements.

sf tenderloin

 

The city has allocated considerable resources to various programs and initiatives aimed at addressing the problems in the Tenderloin District. However, the lack of a robust enforcement strategy and a reliance on social justice principles have not effectively deterred illegal drug use or reduced the negative impacts on the community.

It is evident that the city’s current approach is not working, as evidenced by the persistent challenges faced by the Tenderloin District and other areas of San Francisco. The failure to address these issues has resulted in a waste of public funds and a deterioration of the quality of life for residents and businesses in the affected areas.

To remedy this situation, San Francisco must prioritize the rule of law in its efforts to fix the Tenderloin District. This entails:

  1. Focused Law Enforcement: Implementing a targeted and robust law enforcement strategy to disrupt illegal drug markets and criminal activities in the district.
  2. Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation: Providing rehabilitation programs within the criminal justice system to offer a controlled environment for individuals with substance use disorders to receive treatment and support.
  3. Zero Tolerance for Illegal Drug Activities: Adopting a zero-tolerance policy for illegal drug use and trafficking to send a clear message that such activities will not be tolerated.
  4. Community Engagement: Engaging with local stakeholders to build trust and collaboration in addressing the root causes of the issues in the Tenderloin District.
  5. Transparent and Accountable Spending: Ensuring that public funds are allocated transparently and used accountably to maximize their effectiveness in addressing the challenges faced by the district.

By prioritizing the rule of law and taking decisive action to address the issues in the Tenderloin District, San Francisco can work towards creating a safer, cleaner, and more livable environment for all its residents.  Stop Dancing Around the Issue San Francisco, this is a working plan!

The Case for Entry-Level Signing Bonuses for New Recruits

In the dynamic world of law enforcement, it’s essential to continuously seek innovative approaches to bolster our teams. Building upon the recent discussion of signing bonuses for experienced officers, let’s consider the potential impact of offering an entry-level signing bonus, set at a competitive $35,000.00, for aspiring law enforcement recruits. While this proposed bonus may not match the scale of those provided to lateral hires, its potential in attracting and cultivating a dedicated and enthusiastic new wave of recruits cannot be overlooked.

entry level sign on bonus

 

The introduction of this entry-level signing bonus serves as a testament to our commitment to nurturing a diverse and resilient law enforcement community, one that prioritizes the safety and well-being of our neighborhoods. By attracting and supporting a fresh influx of recruits, we anticipate a significant increase in the number of deputy sheriffs and police officers. This surge in manpower holds the promise of heightened public safety and enhanced care for our communities.

Moreover, as we welcome more staff into our ranks, we anticipate a reduction in overtime and a decrease in the exhaustion experienced by our current deputies and officers. This shift not only promotes a healthier and more sustainable work environment but also ensures that our dedicated law enforcement professionals can carry out their duties effectively and with a renewed focus on serving our communities.

As we contemplate this proposal, it is evident that our dedication to exploring innovative recruitment strategies remains unwavering. By extending a helping hand to the next generation of law enforcement professionals, we are taking vital steps toward building a more secure and safer tomorrow for the communities we serve. San Francisco needs to implement Sign On Bonuses Now!

Cost Neutral Sign On Bonus Program: The Smart Way to Cut Recruitment Costs

In the fast-paced world of law enforcement, we’re all too familiar with the challenges of securing top-notch talent while balancing the books. As we navigate this landscape, one tactic gaining traction is the introduction of cost-neutral lateral officer signing bonuses tailored to recognize the value of all ready trained Deputy Sheriffs and Police Officers. By cutting out the costs tied to academy training, wages, and benefits, often stretching over 6 to 9 months, we can redirect these savings into an enticing signing bonus program for lateral officers which have all ready been trained and have experience, boasting an impressive $75,000.00 similar to Alameda’s Police Sign On Bonus.

Skipping the expenses typically associated with conventional academy training, including instructor fees, equipment purchases, and administrative overhead, frees up a significant chunk of the agency’s budget. Not to mention, bypassing the need to pay wages and benefits to new recruits during their training phase adds to the pot of saved resources. This move acknowledges the skill set and know-how of experienced officers, making long-drawn training periods obsolete and, as a result, bringing in substantial savings for the agency.

By funneling these funds into an attractive signing bonus package, our law enforcement agency positions itself as a competitive and appealing career destination for seasoned professionals. This $75,000.00 sign-on bonus stands as a testament to our recognition of the expertise and dedication of our lateral officers. It’s a powerful motivator for experienced officers to consider making the shift to our team. Their inclusion not only fortifies our operational capabilities but also nurtures a dynamic and diverse work environment brimming with specialized knowledge and honed skills.

With a firm commitment to fiscal responsibility and the nurturing of a high-caliber workforce, the strategic introduction of cost-neutral signing bonuses signals a significant shift in our recruitment approach. By shrewdly redirecting savings from omitted training costs, we demonstrate our unwavering dedication to attracting top-tier talent and bolstering our operational prowess, all in the service of upholding the highest standards of public safety and community well-being.  San Francisco needs to implement Sign On Bonuses Now!

Mayor London Breed’s Strained Relations with Sheriffs Fuel Taxpayer Costs and Public Safety Imbalance in San Francisco

Mayor London Breed’s contentious relationship with the Sheriff’s office in San Francisco has not only sparked a series of lawsuits but has also triggered a financial burden on taxpayers, amplifying concerns about public safety and the welfare of incarcerated people within the county jails. The repercussions of Mayor Breed’s alleged hostility towards the Sheriffs have become increasingly evident, as budget cuts and staffing shortages have resulted in deteriorating jail conditions, mounting legal battles, and a glaring imbalance in the city’s public safety funding.

The degrading conditions within the county jails have prompted a wave of lawsuits filed by prisoners, highlighting the pervasive issues of poor living standards, compromised safety measures, and the absence of adequate healthcare provisions. These legal actions underscore the distressing impact of the Mayor’s purported animosity towards the Sheriff’s office, revealing a systemic neglect of fundamental human rights and a failure to uphold the basic standards of inmate welfare.

Compounding these concerns, the chronic understaffing of deputy sheriffs has not only jeopardized the safety of law enforcement personnel but has also significantly hindered the Sheriff’s office’s ability to ensure the well-being and security of incarcerated people. With the Mayor’s persistent cuts to the Sheriff’s budget, the hiring process has slowed down, at times even halting, exacerbating the strain on an already burdened system and amplifying the risks faced by both inmates and deputies.

 

As a result of these troubling circumstances, the city has faced mounting legal fees and settlements, as lawsuits filed by inmates continue to surface, with many resulting in successful verdicts against the city administration. The financial implications of these legal battles have created a substantial burden on taxpayers, underscoring the urgent need for a comprehensive reassessment of the city’s approach to public safety funding and correctional facility management.

Furthermore, the stark contrast in budgetary allocations, with the Sheriff’s office facing funding cuts while the police and fire departments enjoy increased financial support, has raised questions about the Mayor’s priorities and the equitable distribution of resources. This unbalanced approach to public safety budgeting has not only widened the gap between various law enforcement entities but has also significantly strained the city’s resources, forcing taxpayers to bear the brunt of mounting legal costs and compromised public safety standards.

In light of these challenges, it is imperative for city officials to prioritize the restoration of a balanced and collaborative approach to public safety funding and jail facility management. Addressing the grievances between the Mayor’s office and the Sheriff’s office, along with a comprehensive overhaul of budget allocations, is crucial to ensuring the effective functioning of the jail system and the overall well-being of all residents in San Francisco. Only through a concerted effort to bridge the gap and foster a unified approach to public safety can the city begin to mitigate the financial strain and uphold the rights and dignity of its residents.

San Francisco’s Criminal Justice System: A Balancing Act with Limited Resources and the Mayor’s Funding Failure

San Francisco’s criminal justice system is grappling with a multifaceted crisis, characterized by a significant imbalance in resource allocation, challenges in monitoring pretrial diversion and electronic monitoring, and the persistent issue of outstanding warrants. A critical element that exacerbates this problem is the Mayor’s apparent failure to adequately fund the Sheriff’s Office, which is tasked with managing these critical aspects of the criminal justice system. This article delves deeper into these issues, highlighting the impacts of inadequate funding on the functioning of the system.

A Strain on Sheriff’s Office Resources

San Francisco’s Sheriff’s Office plays a pivotal role in overseeing pretrial diversion programs, electronic monitoring, and the apprehension of individuals with outstanding warrants. However, the Sheriff’s Office has been grappling with resource shortages that severely hamper its effectiveness.

Electronic Monitoring Oversight

Perhaps one of the most glaring issues is the overwhelming caseload faced by a mere one to two deputy sheriffs per shift responsible for monitoring 500 individuals on electronic ankle monitoring. This stark imbalance between the number of offenders and the personnel assigned to oversee them has several consequences:

  1. Inadequate supervision: The limited number of personnel makes it exceedingly difficult to ensure effective supervision and compliance with the terms of electronic monitoring. This raises concerns about the potential for offenders to exploit these conditions or reoffend without proper oversight.
  2. Rehabilitation and reintegration: The objective of electronic monitoring programs, which is to support rehabilitation and successful reintegration into society, becomes questionable when the sheer caseload makes individualized attention and support nearly impossible.

The Overburdened Warrants Service Unit

The Warrants Service Unit, tasked with actively seeking out and apprehending individuals with outstanding warrants, operates with just five deputies. The implications of this understaffing are far-reaching:

  1. Limited apprehension capacity: With a minimal workforce, the unit struggles to locate and arrest individuals with outstanding warrants in a timely manner. This undermines the credibility and effectiveness of the criminal justice system.
  2. Accumulating warrants: The challenges faced by the Warrants Service Unit contribute to the mounting number of outstanding warrants, leaving many individuals unaccounted for and the public at risk.

Mayor’s Failure to Fund

2023 San Francisco budget

It is imperative to address the core issue: the Mayor’s apparent failure to allocate adequate funding to the Sheriff’s Office. This funding deficiency exacerbates the problems within the criminal justice system, resulting in an imbalanced workload for deputies, an ever-increasing number of outstanding warrants, and the erosion of public trust.

The implications of this funding shortfall are clear:

  1. Reduced public safety: Inadequate funding of the Sheriff’s Office directly impacts the safety of San Francisco’s residents. Insufficient resources hinder the effective supervision and apprehension of offenders.
  2. Strain on law enforcement: Deputies are faced with insurmountable caseloads, making it nearly impossible for them to fulfill their responsibilities effectively. This, in turn, affects the quality of rehabilitation programs and the timely apprehension of individuals with outstanding warrants.

San Francisco’s criminal justice system grapples with severe challenges, primarily due to the lack of funding for the Sheriff’s Office. The Mayor’s failure to address this issue has far-reaching consequences, leading to imbalanced workloads, a growing number of outstanding warrants, and a loss of public trust. Addressing this problem requires a fundamental reevaluation of resource allocation and a commitment to bolstering the Sheriff’s Office’s capabilities. It is crucial to bridge this funding gap to ensure that the criminal justice system can meet its core objectives while safeguarding the interests of the community.

Unmasking Mayor London Breed’s Aggressive Defunding of San Francisco’s Sheriff’s Office

In the heart of San Francisco’s ever-shifting political landscape, a storm of controversy is brewing. The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office is facing a stark and troubling reality – a calculated series of budget cuts and policy shifts that paint a disturbing picture of Mayor London Breed’s unwavering campaign to defund law enforcement in the city. In this article, we’ll meticulously dissect the timeline of events that make a compelling and nuanced case for the Mayor’s relentless assault on the city’s law enforcement agencies.

A History of Radical Reform

Mayor London Breed’s political journey began as a member of the Board of Supervisors, and from the very beginning, she made it clear that she was on a mission to overhaul what she perceived as a deeply flawed criminal justice system. Her 2015 statement sent shockwaves through the city, as she passionately declared her intent to “tear down the system of mass incarceration.” This declaration was not a mere political posture; it was deeply personal, rooted in her familial ties to individuals behind bars.

 

San Francisco’s Unique Approach Scrutinized

San Francisco has long prided itself on its progressive approach to criminal justice, prioritizing rehabilitation over incarceration. The city’s history has been punctuated by numerous chances given to offenders, emphasizing diversion programs and alternatives to conventional incarceration. However, this progressive leniency took an unprecedented turn when the city began diverting criminals away from traditional imprisonment. This drastic shift triggered widespread public outrage, driven by the brazen open-air drug dealing and an alarming surge in drug overdose deaths.

Mayor Breed’s Inconsistent Stance

Amid mounting public pressure, Mayor Breed reluctantly increased the presence of law enforcement on the city’s streets. However, her efforts appeared lukewarm at best, and the city continued to prioritize rehabilitation over punitive measures. This approach left San Francisco with a troubling reputation – a city that wields the carrot without ever brandishing the stick. While the jail population did see a marginal increase from its lowest point two months prior, street-level crime continued unabated, further casting doubts on the city’s commitment to public safety.

The Mayor’s Bold 2020 Pro-Defunding Declaration

In 2020, Mayor Breed publicly embraced the nationwide call to defund the police, aligning herself with a movement that sought to reallocate funds away from law enforcement. This audacious proclamation heralded a seismic shift in the city’s approach to public safety and hinted at her intentions to fundamentally reshape the foundations of law enforcement in San Francisco.

Mixed Signals in 2022

However, as the year 2022 dawned, Mayor Breed deftly pivoted her public messaging to appear more pro-public safety, even as her actions told a different story. She imposed a nine-month freeze on deputy sheriff and police hiring, a decision that severely impacted staffing numbers, rendering the city more vulnerable to crime.

Budgetary Maneuvers Speak Volumes

Budget allocations often serve as a clear reflection of a leader’s priorities. In February 2021, as part of the budget process, Mayor Breed orchestrated a staggering redirection of $120 million from law enforcement to investments in the African American community. This financial maneuver underscored her commitment to resource reallocation.

In 2023, Mayor Breed’s office continued to raise eyebrows with significant slowdowns in the hiring process, a subtle but potent form of budget reduction. In April of the same year, she denied a longevity incentive designed to retain deputy sheriffs, despite a glaring shortage in the ranks. In July, she initially proposed a 5% budget cut to the Sheriff’s Office but ultimately executed a 2.5% reduction. And in September, it came to light that funding for crucial law enforcement tools like body cameras, tasers, and ammunition had been mercilessly slashed.

 

The Sheriff’s Office’s Apprehensive Response

In the face of relentless budget cuts and policy shifts, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office finds itself not only stunned but deeply concerned, particularly in the context of soaring crime rates plaguing the city. It appears that Mayor Breed’s actions are inextricably linked to her personal commitment to criminal justice reform, resulting in a reduction in law enforcement officers and an aggressive push for the civilianization of the police.

The Civilianization of Law Enforcement: Aligning with the Extreme Left’s Agenda

One prominent shift that has sent shockwaves through the San Francisco law enforcement landscape is the introduction of street crisis teams composed of Urban Alchemy workers, who now act as first responders in select situations. This marked transition towards civilianization of certain aspects of law enforcement has not only raised eyebrows but also drawn attention to its alignment with the extreme left’s agenda for criminal justice reform.

It is no secret that progressive elements on the political spectrum have long advocated for the civilianization of law enforcement, viewing traditional policing as inherently flawed and overly punitive. San Francisco’s embrace of this approach reflects a broader ideological shift, where the emphasis on community-based solutions and de-escalation tactics takes precedence over traditional law enforcement methods.

However, all one has to do is look around San Francisco to see that this approach is not working. The city’s streets are marred by open-air drug dealing, rampant crime, and a palpable sense of insecurity among its residents. Critics argue that while civilianization may have noble intentions, it has resulted in a system ill-equipped to address the complex and persistent challenges of urban safety.

While proponents argue that civilianizing law enforcement can lead to more empathetic and community-oriented policing, critics express concerns about the potential ramifications on public safety and law enforcement effectiveness. The debate over the civilianization of law enforcement is emblematic of the larger struggle between reformist ideologies and the need for maintaining public safety—a battle that is currently playing out in San Francisco’s streets and city halls.

Conclusion: A Critical Crossroads

The mounting evidence leaves little room for doubt – Mayor London Breed’s relentless assault on the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office is not just a byproduct of her commitment to criminal justice reform; it’s a calculated and multifaceted agenda. As the city grapples with these complex issues, the delicate balance between reform and public safety teeters on a precipice. The choices made in the coming months will undoubtedly have profound and lasting consequences for the city and its residents, defining the future of criminal justice in San Francisco.

Ensuring Public Safety: The Vital Need for Armed Peace Officers in the Medical Examiner’s Office

SF Medical Examiner Investigator In recent times, the role of peace officers within the Medical Examiner’s Office has come under scrutiny. The issue at hand revolves around the authorization for these peace officers to carry firearms on duty. Our union, recognizing the potential risks and the impact on public safety, initiated a letter correspondence with the Medical Examiner’s Office. This article delves into the critical importance of arming these peace officers and highlights our recent response to address the matter.

The Medical Examiner’s Office plays a crucial role in investigating deaths and providing critical insights into the causes. However, it is essential to acknowledge that these investigations often take place in challenging environments, including high crime areas. The presence of peace officers within the Medical Examiner’s Office is not a mere formality; it serves as a vital component in ensuring the safety of all involved.

Our Initial Request: Recognizing the potential dangers faced by Medical Examiner Investigators, our union penned a letter to the Medical Examiner’s Office, urging them to authorize peace officers to carry firearms on duty. We highlighted the detrimental impact of disallowing these peace officers from being armed and emphasized the negative implications on public safety. It was our firm belief that by granting them the ability to carry firearms, we could enhance their capacity to respond to emergencies, protect themselves, and effectively fulfill their responsibilities.

The Medical Examiner Office’s Response: In their response, the Medical Examiner’s Office downplayed the peace officerCA Peace Officer Standards and Training designation within their agency and did not even acknowledge that they have California Peace Officer Standard of Training Certification, emphasizing their civilian-led approach. While we appreciate their perspective, it is crucial to recognize that peace officers play a pivotal role in enforcing laws, protecting the public, and responding to emergencies. Dismissing their authority and the need for them to be armed undermines their effectiveness and compromises the safety of both the investigators and the communities they serve.

In our recent response to the Medical Examiner’s Office, we reiterated the criticality of authorizing peace officers within the Medical Examiner’s Office to carry firearms on duty. We emphasized that this decision was not a form of defunding police power but rather a proactive measure to enhance public safety. By enabling our Medical Examiner Investigators to be armed, we ensure they have the means to protect themselves, others, and intervene in potentially dangerous situations. Moreover, it alleviates the burden on local law enforcement agencies, enabling them to allocate resources more efficiently.

The ongoing dialogue between our union and the Medical Examiner’s Office highlights the pressing need to address the issue of arming peace officers within the Medical Examiner’s Office. It is vital to recognize that public safety should always remain a top priority. By granting peace officers the ability to carry firearms, we can ensure the safety of our investigators and enhance their effectiveness in responding to emergencies. It is our hope that the Medical Examiner’s Office will reevaluate their stance and take decisive action that aligns with the shared commitment to public safety.

Together, let us work towards a safer future, where peace officers in the Medical Examiner’s Office can perform their duties without compromising their safety or the safety of the public they serve.

Ken Lomba
President, San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association
Representing the OCME Investigators
(415) 696-2428

 

San Francisco Sheriff’s Office Takes Bold Action as Mayor Breed’s Strategies Fall Short in Drug Crisis

In a stunning turn of events, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office has emerged as the driving force in the fight against the escalating drug crisis, as Mayor London Breed’s strategies continue to fall short. With the city grappling with drug-related issues, Sheriff Paul Miyamoto has taken decisive action, unveiling a courageous plan to deploy 130 additional deputies to the troubled Tenderloin and South of Market (SoMa) neighborhoods.

SF Sheriff Tenderloin Initiative
SF Sheriff Tenderloin Initiative

While Mayor Breed’s approach has faced criticism for its ineffectiveness, Sheriff Miyamoto has stepped up to lead the charge in tackling the deep-rooted drug problem. With resolute determination, the Sheriff’s Office has presented a comprehensive strategy to address drug dealers and individuals openly using drugs in public. The deployment of additional deputies, starting this month, signifies a seismic shift in the battle against crime and substance abuse.

Sheriff Miyamoto, flanked by concerned citizens and law enforcement officials, announced this groundbreaking initiative outside City Hall. With unwavering resolve, he highlighted the urgent need for effective action in combating the city’s drug crisis. The Sheriff’s Office, guided by a steadfast commitment to public safety, is now taking the reins in the quest to find real solutions.

While the Sheriff’s Office courageously assumes a leading role, it is no secret that Mayor Breed’s strategies have fallen short of expectations. The current approach has been marred by limited success and persistent challenges. Public health experts have long decried the idea of relying on incarceration and criminalization as effective means to address substance abuse disorders.


However, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office’s proactive stance offers hope for a different path forward. By increasing law enforcement presence and targeting drug-related offenses, they aim to restore order and offer a helping hand to those struggling with addiction. The Sheriff’s Office’s unwavering dedication to the community’s well-being is a testament to their commitment to creating lasting change.

Nevertheless, significant hurdles remain in this uphill battle. Both the San Francisco Police Department and the Sheriff’s Office confront staffing shortages that hinder their ability to effectively address the city’s safety concerns. Police Chief Bill Scott emphasized the importance of receiving adequate funding and support from elected officials to overcome these challenges. The commitment of city leaders to address staffing issues will be crucial in achieving tangible progress.

As the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office takes bold strides in confronting the drug crisis, it is evident that their approach stands in stark contrast to Mayor Breed’s faltering strategies. With their specialized training and unwavering dedication, the Sheriff’s Office deputies will fearlessly patrol the streets, tackling criminal elements head-on and extending a lifeline to those lost in the grips of addiction.

While the Sheriff’s Office shoulders the burden of this monumental task, it is vital for the community to rally behind them. Together, we can bring about meaningful change, ensuring a safer and healthier future for San Francisco. Let us unite in support of the determined men and women of the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office as they lead the charge to reshape our city’s destiny in the face of a daunting drug crisis.

Mayor London Breed’s Covert Defunding Tactics: Undermining the Sheriff’s Department

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mayor London Breed’s strategic defunding of the Sheriff’s Department in San Francisco has ignited concerns among law enforcement officials and citizens alike. Operating under the radar, these silent defunding measures, such as the denial of the longevity incentive proposal on May 15th, 2023, and disproportionate budget cuts, are adversely impacting the department’s staffing levels and compromising public safety. Let’s examine these covert actions and their potential ramifications on the Sheriff’s Department.

Denial of Longevity Incentive Proposal

One glaring example of Mayor Breed’s covert defunding strategy is the denial of the longevity incentive proposal. On May 15th, 2023, Mayor Breed rejected this proposal aimed at retaining experienced deputies eligible for retirement, and she also failed to come to the table with a counter proposal or offer any alternative ideas to address the issue. This lack of engagement and proactive effort from the mayor demonstrates a concerning disregard for the retention of deputy sheriffs and exacerbates the ongoing staffing crisis within the Sheriff’s Department. The loss of 50 to 110 deputies due to early retirement further strains the department, leading to increased workloads, reduced efficiency, and compromised public safety.

Budget Cuts and Disproportionate Allocation

Mayor Breed’s budget decisions further illustrate her covert defunding tactics. While slashing the Sheriff’s Department budget by 3%, the mayor simultaneously increased the budgets of other public safety departments, such as the police by 9% and the fire department by 3%. This disproportionate allocation sends a troubling message about the mayor’s priorities and undermines the Sheriff’s Department’s ability to effectively carry out its duties.

Unused Funds and Overtime Reduction

The mayor’s claim of utilizing unused funds from vacant positions and reducing overtime within the Sheriff’s Office raises questions about the allocation of resources. If these funds were available, they could have been redirected to support initiatives like the longevity incentive proposal, thereby mitigating staffing shortages and reducing the need for overtime. However, the failure to do so implies a disregard for the long-term sustainability of the department and places an unnecessary burden on the existing workforce.

Implications for Public Safety and Financial Efficiency

The consequences of Mayor Breed’s covert defunding tactics extend beyond understaffing. Insufficient staffing levels compromise response times, limit the department’s ability to proactively address emerging challenges, and hinder the delivery of essential services to the community. Moreover, the reliance on overtime to fill vacant positions not only strains the budget but also places an additional burden on the dedicated deputies who shoulder the increased workload.

A Call for Accountability and Transparency

In light of these concerning developments, it is crucial for concerned citizens, deputies, and community stakeholders to hold Mayor London Breed accountable for her silent defunding strategies. The Sheriff’s Department plays a vital role in maintaining public safety, and it deserves the necessary resources and support to fulfill its duties effectively.

Additionally, transparency and open dialogue are imperative in addressing these budgetary concerns. Citizens must demand clear explanations and justifications for the disproportionate budget cuts and the denial of proposals aimed at retaining experienced deputies. By fostering transparency, the community can actively participate in shaping a fair and effective criminal justice system that prioritizes public safety.

Mayor London Breed’s covert defunding tactics targeting the Sheriff’s Department in San Francisco have serious implications for public safety and the well-being of the community. The denial of the longevity incentive proposal on May 15th, 2023, without offering any alternative solutions, and the disproportionate budget cuts jeopardize the department’s staffing levels, hindering its ability to maintain law and order effectively. It is essential for citizens and stakeholders to voice their concerns, demand accountability, and advocate for the allocation of resources that align with the department’s needs. Only through open dialogue and collaborative efforts can we ensure a robust and secure future for the Sheriff’s Department and the community it serves. By holding Mayor Breed accountable for her silent defunding strategies, we can work towards a fair and effective criminal justice system that prioritizes public safety and upholds the principles of justice and equality.

 

Media Contact:

Ken Lomba
President
San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association
415-696-2428

Mayor Breed’s budget worsens the unconstitutional conditions of San Francisco County Jails

PRESS RELEASE

Mayor Breed’s budget – released yesterday –worsens the unconstitutional conditions of San Francisco County Jails at San Bruno and at 7th Street for inmates’; conditions which cause long term chronic illness, and increases the lack of safety for both inmates and deputies. The City is currently being sued for these unconstitutional conditions. Both the San Bruno Jail (County Jail 3) and the 7th Street Jail (County Jail 2) are in violation of Building Code, Title 24, and cannot meet California Regulations. Staffing is already woefully short, forcing the jail to regularly lockdown all prisoners, denying inmates out of cell time, and creating in essence solitary confinement. This is all unconstitutional. Recently the Mayor denied a longevity proposal that would retain needed deputies that are now going to retire but gave longevity incentives to Police and Fire. Yet, Mayor Breed’s budget cuts another 3% off the Sheriff’s budget, while increasing the police budget by 9%. The increase in police hiring is to encourage new arrests. New arrests will increase the inmate population and any increased inmate population will only make the unconstitutional conditions at County Jails worse.

Right now, we have inmates who have been incarcerated for years. At least 60 inmates have been incarcerated for over 4 years. These jails have no outdoor facilities, and so all inmates are housed 24/7 under fluorescent lights. With lockdowns, inmates are forced inside their cell without exercise, without showers, without meaningful human interaction and contact, at times for 24 hours or more. Studies show that forced isolation is one of the worst things that can happen to inmates. Stressed out and mentally ill inmates are a danger to themselves and to deputies.

The lawsuit, Norbert v. CCSF , 3:19-cv-02724 is set for trial on August 8, 2023. San Francisco has no defense for why our jails violate the building code. And the plaintiffs in Norbert claim that denying human beings – long term – outdoor sunlight causes chronic illness, including diabetes. One of the plaintiffs, M. Brackens has developed diabetes while incarcerated in San Francisco County Jail.

The San Francisco Deputy Sheriff’s Association wants to do our job, and do it in a way that treats inmates humanely. The Sheriff’s Department Mission Statement says that the Sheriff is committed to the “constitutional detention” of inmates. The Mayor needs to allocate enough funding so that all inmates receive constitutional conditions of confinement.

We were forced to close 850 Bryant Street because it was so dilapidated that there were regular raw sewage spills in jail cells. That cost the City $2.1 million in a lawsuit.

San Francisco needs to provide jails that meet all building code and constitutional standards. And the Sheriff’s Department cannot do so, if the Mayor keeps cutting the Sheriff’s budget so there’s not enough staffing, and sufficient capital investment in the jails themselves so that the jails meet constitutional standards.

Ken Lomba
President
San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association
415-696-2428