Addressing the Extreme Shortage of Deputy Sheriffs: A Call to Action

In a recent open letter addressed to Mayor London Breed, Sheriff Paul Miyamoto, Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin, and the Members of the Board of Supervisors, the San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association (DSA) has proposed a critical solution to the severe understaffing of Deputy Sheriffs in our city. The proposal, submitted on May 23, 2024, aims to eliminate the first step of the salary schedule for Deputy Sheriffs (positions 8302 and 8504), intending to attract more applicants and, importantly, to secure higher quality candidates.

The Urgent Need for Action
As many of you are aware, our Deputy Sheriffs are operating under dangerously low staffing levels, leading to unsafe conditions for both our Deputies and inmates. Despite the DSA’s proactive efforts to assist with recruitment through advertising funded by our own association, the current pay scale for entry-level Deputies remains a significant barrier. Comparable agencies in the region offer substantially higher starting salaries, making it challenging for us to compete for top-tier talent.

Learning from the Police Department
The San Francisco Police Department has successfully addressed their recruitment challenges by increasing their starting pay, which has proven effective in attracting more applicants. Additionally, the Mayor’s Office supported this effort by implementing a $5,000 signing bonus for new police recruits, distributed as $2,500 upon completion of the Field Training Program (FTO) and an additional $2,500 upon successful completion of the probation period. This incentive underscores the importance of competitive compensation packages in attracting new talent. Currently, we lack such a signing bonus, making it even more critical to remove the first step of our pay scale to attract new applicants.

The Impact on Quality of Life and Safety
The understaffing crisis not only endangers our Deputies but also severely impacts the quality of life for inmates. The shortage of staff has led to more frequent lockdowns, disrupting rehabilitation programs, educational classes, legal interviews, and family and friend visitations. More alarmingly, violence has increased within the jails, exacerbating stress and frustration among inmates. This situation is unacceptable. San Francisco’s jails once served as a model for others, but now they face the same challenges and issues typically associated with prisons.

The Proposal
Our proposal recommends the removal of the first step in the salary schedule. By doing so, we aim to make the Deputy Sheriff position more competitive in the job market, thereby improving our recruitment capabilities and attracting more qualified candidates. This strategy has proven effective for the San Francisco Police Officers’ Association, and we are confident it will yield similar results for our Department.

 

A Test of Commitment to Public Safety
The implementation of this proposal is more than just an administrative change—it is a test of our city leadership’s commitment to public safety. By offering a more attractive compensation package, we can enhance our ability to recruit and retain the best candidates, ultimately ensuring a safer and more effective environment for both our Deputies and the communities we serve.

The time to act is now. The DSA has laid out a clear, actionable plan to address the extreme shortage of Deputy Sheriffs. We urge city leadership to take immediate action on this proposal to safeguard the well-being of our Deputies and the individuals in our care. The coming weeks will reveal where our leaders truly stand on the issue of public safety.

Will they implement this critical change and demonstrate their commitment to protecting our community, or will they allow the status quo to persist, further endangering the lives of Deputies and inmates alike? The answer will speak volumes.

Stay tuned and stay engaged. The safety of our city depends on it.

Ken Lomba
President, San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association

Silence in the Face of Crisis: Non-Response from Mayor and Sheriff to Union’s Plea

In recent months, the San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association has been vocal about the critical issues plaguing our department. From severe staffing shortages to increasing incidents of prisoner violence, we have been sounding the alarm on the urgent need for action. A key step in this advocacy was a letter sent to Mayor London Breed, Sheriff Paul Miyamoto, and Board President Aaron Peskin, detailing these concerns and calling for immediate intervention.

However, the response – or lack thereof – has been deeply disheartening.

London Breed and Paul Miyamoto

A Deafening Silence from the Mayor

Mayor London Breed has yet to acknowledge or respond to our letter. This silence is particularly troubling given the gravity of the issues at hand. The safety of our deputies, the well-being of prisoners, and the overall security of our community are at stake. The mayor’s non-response not only undermines the efforts of our deputies but also sends a concerning message about the administration’s priorities regarding public safety.

The Sheriff’s Unanswered Call

Sheriff Paul Miyamoto, similarly, has not responded to the letter. This lack of communication is alarming, especially considering that he is directly responsible for the conditions within our jails. The issues raised in our letter are not new; they have been escalating for years. Despite this, the sheriff has chosen not to engage with the union on these critical matters.


A Thank You to the Board of Supervisors

In contrast, the Board of Supervisors has taken a step towards addressing these issues by calling Sheriff Miyamoto into a hearing. During this session, the sheriff was questioned about the ongoing staffing crisis and the resultant safety concerns. We extend our gratitude to the Board of Supervisors for recognizing the severity of the situation and taking action. This hearing is a positive step towards accountability and solutions.


The Implications of Inaction

The non-response from both the mayor and the sheriff is more than just a communication breakdown; it is a stark indicator of the broader neglect of our department’s needs. Our deputies continue to work under hazardous conditions, stretched thin by understaffing and facing increasing risks of violence. The refusal to engage with the union on these issues not only hampers our ability to find solutions but also puts lives at risk.

A Call for Immediate Action

We urge Mayor Breed and Sheriff Miyamoto to break their silence and address the pressing issues outlined in our letter. The safety of our deputies, prisoners, and the public depends on it. The time for inaction has passed; we need concrete steps and open dialogue to resolve the crises within our jails.

The San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association remains committed to advocating for the well-being of our members and the safety of our community. We call on our city’s leaders to join us in this mission and take immediate action to address the critical issues at hand.

Op-Ed by SF Undersheriff Freeman (Ret) on Current Conditions of the Sheriff’s Office

SF Undersheriff FreemanFor thirty years (1991-2021) spanning four different Sheriff’s, I served with pride as a sworn peace officer in the City and County of San Francisco Sheriff’s Department, the last four of which I had the honor to serve as Undersheriff.

Having held every rank in the department and worked in many different assignments, I came to realize that the Sheriff’s Department is not an inanimate object, rather it is organic. The deputy sheriff is the heart of a living organization.

Since my retirement in February 2021, I have followed the trajectory of the department, its leadership, and the stewardship of the deputy sheriffs.  It is painfully clear that the deputy sheriffs who patrol the toughest beat in San Francisco (the county jail) are under constant attack.

The recent and horrific assaults on deputies by inmates in the county jail some of which have resulted in broken bones, torn skin, and head injuries are a shock to all San Franciscans.

Based on my thirty years of experience, I can tell you that these attacks are 100% avoidable. As a deputy sheriff, I was well-trained, well-equipped, and educated in the proper application of tactical communications.

I knew well the importance of garnering voluntary compliance when supervising an inmate housing area. Core to this was treating inmates with dignity and respect. My job was not to punish, but rather to maintain safety while inmates progressed through the criminal justice system.

Assaults on deputies throughout my career were very rare. In fact, in most cases the only time a deputy sheriff was struck by an inmate was when a deputy was separating inmates that were fighting each other.  There have been more assaults on deputies in the last 60 days than in my entire thirty-year career.  The rash of recent attacks on deputy sheriffs is not normal.

It is the result of incompetent if not indifferent leadership in the Sheriff’s Department. The deputies and their line supervisors are not being trained properly, nor are they being supported by the command staff.

This dynamic leads to deputies that feel as if they are not supported. They become unsure of their training, capabilities, and authority while supervising inmates.  It invites violence as the inmates can sense that the deputies are nervous, leading the inmates to feel as if they are not safe. The inmates lash out as if to fill the void of no control.

It is a recipe for disaster in the county jail.
This dangerous problem is further exacerbated by the lack of recreation space to include outdoor recreation for the inmates. Prior to retiring, I worked closely with the city attorney and a team of Sheriffs personnel to address this very important issue. Unfortunately, Sheriff Miyamoto lacked the courage to stand up to those who objected to the needed capital improvements to the county jail. Outdoor recreation, access to sunshine and clean air significantly reduces violent behavior. Of course, the Sheriff’s Department would require additional deputies to supervise outdoor recreation. The lack of hiring highlights another failure of the current Sheriff administration.

Safe and secure county jail operations rely heavily on the leadership, mentorship, and support of the Custody Operations Division Chief Deputy and the individual Jail Captains. They are failing miserably.
Ultimately the responsibility to keep and maintain a safe and secure county jail for staff and inmates alike falls to Sheriff Miyamoto.  He must be distracted.

The members of the San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association, the bargaining unit that represents deputy sheriffs deserve if not demand that Sheriff Miyamoto re-focus his attention on the most important asset of the department – Deputy Sheriff.
The department has over 150 deputy vacancies. Deputies are forced to work too much overtime, they are required to supervise too many inmates absent adequate coverage. The training and support by leadership are subpar.

The path to successful public safety in San Francisco traverses both the front and back doors of the county jail. Public safety suffers for all when the deputies are fatigued and not provided with proper support. 

The deputies deserve better, the inmates deserve better and all San Franciscans must demand better of their Sheriff.

Matthew Freeman
Undersheriff (Ret.)
San Francisco Sheriff’s Department

San Francisco Sheriff’s Office: Operating on a Debt-Based Budget with Overtime Slavery

In recent years, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) has been embroiled in a disturbing practice of operating on a debt-based budget, resorting to what can only be described as overtime slavery to balance its fiscal books. This unethical approach, characterized by the forced imposition of excessive overtime on deputy sheriffs, is not only financially irresponsible but also morally reprehensible, taking a severe toll on the health and well-being of those sworn to protect and serve.

One of the key tactics used in this budgetary strategy is budgetary attrition savings, a process whereby the sheriff deliberately hires fewer deputies than what is needed to adequately staff the department. This intentional understaffing creates a limited savings of benefits and training costs, as the shortfall is then filled by forcing existing deputies to work excessive overtime hours.

SFSO Debt Based BudgetDespite clear data indicating the harmful impacts of this practice, the SFSO leadership has persisted in its reliance on forced overtime to cover budgeted attrition and maintain fiscal balance. This shortsighted strategy prioritizes financial expediency over the physical and mental health of deputy sheriffs, creating a toxic work environment and jeopardizing public safety.

Data collected over recent years paints a grim picture. Forced overtime has become a norm, with deputy sheriffs compelled to work extended hours without adequate rest or respite. This relentless schedule not only leads to exhaustion and burnout but also compromises the ability of deputies to perform their duties effectively and safely, endangering both themselves and the community they serve.

The use of forced overtime as a budgetary tool is symptomatic of a larger failure within the SFSO to manage its resources responsibly. Instead of advocating for a budget that reflects realistic staffing levels and limits on overtime, the sheriff has opted for a reckless path that exploits the dedication of deputy sheriffs to balance the books.

The consequences of this debt-based budgeting approach are dire. Deputy sheriffs are experiencing alarming rates of burnout and fatigue, leading to increased absenteeism and turnover. This vicious cycle of overwork and exhaustion not only harms the physical and mental health of deputy sheriffs but also undermines the effectiveness and integrity of the SFSO as a whole.

It is imperative that immediate action be taken to address this crisis. The SFSO must abandon its reliance on overtime slavery and commit to a budgetary approach that prioritizes the well-being of its deputies. Anything less would be a betrayal of the trust placed in the SFSO by the residents of San Francisco and a disservice to those who dedicate their lives to serving and protecting the community.

Overtime Slavery: San Francisco Sheriff’s Office Struggles Amidst Rising Violence and Staff Shortages

Within the walls of the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office, a troubling reality is unfolding. Deputies, the frontline warriors of law enforcement, are being pushed to their limits by an unyielding demand for overtime work. This alarming situation, highlighted by a recent survey led by expert Lois James, PhD, paints a grim picture of overworked deputies, jeopardizing both their well-being and the safety of the community they serve.

The survey reveals a shocking truth: deputies are surviving on an average of just 5.25 hours of sleep per night, well below the recommended 7-9 hours. This chronic sleep deprivation not only threatens their health but also undermines their ability to make sound decisions and react quickly in critical situations, putting themselves and others at risk.

Staffing Crisis

Staffing Comments

The implications of this overtime slavery are profound. More than half of the deputies report high blood pressure, a third suffer from sleep apnea, and nearly three-quarters exhibit symptoms of depression. These stark figures underscore a workforce on the brink, their physical and mental health hanging in the balance.

The numbers tell a sobering story. Deputies are logging an average of 28 hours of overtime per week, a staggering figure that triples the recommended limit set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This relentless overtime not only compromises their health but also diminishes their performance, with deputies 50% more likely to be involved in incidents while working overtime.

Adding to the pressure is the rising violence within the prison system. Incidents of prisoner fights have increased significantly, placing additional strain on an already overburdened staff. Attacks on deputies are also on the rise, highlighting the urgent need for a fully staffed and supported workforce.

Sheriff Miyamoto’s heavy reliance on mandatory overtime has created a toxic environment within the Sheriff’s Office, akin to modern-day slavery. Deputies are being pushed to their limits, with little regard for their well-being or rights. It’s a crisis that demands immediate attention, as lives are on the line.

Despite these challenges, Miyamoto has failed to prioritize recruiting and hiring, exacerbating the staffing shortages and placing further strain on an already overwhelmed workforce. As the sun sets over the Golden Gate, the deputies of the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office continue to toil, trapped in a cycle of exhaustion and despair. How much longer can they endure? Will Sheriff Miyamoto take decisive action to end their suffering? The time for change is now.

To ensure the safety of both deputies and the community, the Sheriff’s Office must bolster its ranks by approximately 308 deputies. Failure to address this crisis will perpetuate a cycle of exploitation and endangerment, with grave consequences for all involved.

Applying the Rule of Law to Fix San Francisco’s Tenderloin District

San Francisco’s Tenderloin District has faced longstanding challenges related to drug use, crime, and homelessness. Despite efforts to address these issues, the district continues to struggle with illegal drug markets, public health hazards, and social disorder. San Francisco’s approach, which has focused on social justice ideas and initiatives with minimal consequences for illegal activities, has failed to yield significant improvements.

sf tenderloin

 

The city has allocated considerable resources to various programs and initiatives aimed at addressing the problems in the Tenderloin District. However, the lack of a robust enforcement strategy and a reliance on social justice principles have not effectively deterred illegal drug use or reduced the negative impacts on the community.

It is evident that the city’s current approach is not working, as evidenced by the persistent challenges faced by the Tenderloin District and other areas of San Francisco. The failure to address these issues has resulted in a waste of public funds and a deterioration of the quality of life for residents and businesses in the affected areas.

To remedy this situation, San Francisco must prioritize the rule of law in its efforts to fix the Tenderloin District. This entails:

  1. Focused Law Enforcement: Implementing a targeted and robust law enforcement strategy to disrupt illegal drug markets and criminal activities in the district.
  2. Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation: Providing rehabilitation programs within the criminal justice system to offer a controlled environment for individuals with substance use disorders to receive treatment and support.
  3. Zero Tolerance for Illegal Drug Activities: Adopting a zero-tolerance policy for illegal drug use and trafficking to send a clear message that such activities will not be tolerated.
  4. Community Engagement: Engaging with local stakeholders to build trust and collaboration in addressing the root causes of the issues in the Tenderloin District.
  5. Transparent and Accountable Spending: Ensuring that public funds are allocated transparently and used accountably to maximize their effectiveness in addressing the challenges faced by the district.

By prioritizing the rule of law and taking decisive action to address the issues in the Tenderloin District, San Francisco can work towards creating a safer, cleaner, and more livable environment for all its residents.  Stop Dancing Around the Issue San Francisco, this is a working plan!

The Case for Entry-Level Signing Bonuses for New Recruits

In the dynamic world of law enforcement, it’s essential to continuously seek innovative approaches to bolster our teams. Building upon the recent discussion of signing bonuses for experienced officers, let’s consider the potential impact of offering an entry-level signing bonus, set at a competitive $35,000.00, for aspiring law enforcement recruits. While this proposed bonus may not match the scale of those provided to lateral hires, its potential in attracting and cultivating a dedicated and enthusiastic new wave of recruits cannot be overlooked.

entry level sign on bonus

 

The introduction of this entry-level signing bonus serves as a testament to our commitment to nurturing a diverse and resilient law enforcement community, one that prioritizes the safety and well-being of our neighborhoods. By attracting and supporting a fresh influx of recruits, we anticipate a significant increase in the number of deputy sheriffs and police officers. This surge in manpower holds the promise of heightened public safety and enhanced care for our communities.

Moreover, as we welcome more staff into our ranks, we anticipate a reduction in overtime and a decrease in the exhaustion experienced by our current deputies and officers. This shift not only promotes a healthier and more sustainable work environment but also ensures that our dedicated law enforcement professionals can carry out their duties effectively and with a renewed focus on serving our communities.

As we contemplate this proposal, it is evident that our dedication to exploring innovative recruitment strategies remains unwavering. By extending a helping hand to the next generation of law enforcement professionals, we are taking vital steps toward building a more secure and safer tomorrow for the communities we serve. San Francisco needs to implement Sign On Bonuses Now!

Cost Neutral Sign On Bonus Program: The Smart Way to Cut Recruitment Costs

In the fast-paced world of law enforcement, we’re all too familiar with the challenges of securing top-notch talent while balancing the books. As we navigate this landscape, one tactic gaining traction is the introduction of cost-neutral lateral officer signing bonuses tailored to recognize the value of all ready trained Deputy Sheriffs and Police Officers. By cutting out the costs tied to academy training, wages, and benefits, often stretching over 6 to 9 months, we can redirect these savings into an enticing signing bonus program for lateral officers which have all ready been trained and have experience, boasting an impressive $75,000.00 similar to Alameda’s Police Sign On Bonus.

Skipping the expenses typically associated with conventional academy training, including instructor fees, equipment purchases, and administrative overhead, frees up a significant chunk of the agency’s budget. Not to mention, bypassing the need to pay wages and benefits to new recruits during their training phase adds to the pot of saved resources. This move acknowledges the skill set and know-how of experienced officers, making long-drawn training periods obsolete and, as a result, bringing in substantial savings for the agency.

By funneling these funds into an attractive signing bonus package, our law enforcement agency positions itself as a competitive and appealing career destination for seasoned professionals. This $75,000.00 sign-on bonus stands as a testament to our recognition of the expertise and dedication of our lateral officers. It’s a powerful motivator for experienced officers to consider making the shift to our team. Their inclusion not only fortifies our operational capabilities but also nurtures a dynamic and diverse work environment brimming with specialized knowledge and honed skills.

With a firm commitment to fiscal responsibility and the nurturing of a high-caliber workforce, the strategic introduction of cost-neutral signing bonuses signals a significant shift in our recruitment approach. By shrewdly redirecting savings from omitted training costs, we demonstrate our unwavering dedication to attracting top-tier talent and bolstering our operational prowess, all in the service of upholding the highest standards of public safety and community well-being.  San Francisco needs to implement Sign On Bonuses Now!

Mayor London Breed’s Strained Relations with Sheriffs Fuel Taxpayer Costs and Public Safety Imbalance in San Francisco

Mayor London Breed’s contentious relationship with the Sheriff’s office in San Francisco has not only sparked a series of lawsuits but has also triggered a financial burden on taxpayers, amplifying concerns about public safety and the welfare of incarcerated people within the county jails. The repercussions of Mayor Breed’s alleged hostility towards the Sheriffs have become increasingly evident, as budget cuts and staffing shortages have resulted in deteriorating jail conditions, mounting legal battles, and a glaring imbalance in the city’s public safety funding.

The degrading conditions within the county jails have prompted a wave of lawsuits filed by prisoners, highlighting the pervasive issues of poor living standards, compromised safety measures, and the absence of adequate healthcare provisions. These legal actions underscore the distressing impact of the Mayor’s purported animosity towards the Sheriff’s office, revealing a systemic neglect of fundamental human rights and a failure to uphold the basic standards of inmate welfare.

Compounding these concerns, the chronic understaffing of deputy sheriffs has not only jeopardized the safety of law enforcement personnel but has also significantly hindered the Sheriff’s office’s ability to ensure the well-being and security of incarcerated people. With the Mayor’s persistent cuts to the Sheriff’s budget, the hiring process has slowed down, at times even halting, exacerbating the strain on an already burdened system and amplifying the risks faced by both inmates and deputies.

 

As a result of these troubling circumstances, the city has faced mounting legal fees and settlements, as lawsuits filed by inmates continue to surface, with many resulting in successful verdicts against the city administration. The financial implications of these legal battles have created a substantial burden on taxpayers, underscoring the urgent need for a comprehensive reassessment of the city’s approach to public safety funding and correctional facility management.

Furthermore, the stark contrast in budgetary allocations, with the Sheriff’s office facing funding cuts while the police and fire departments enjoy increased financial support, has raised questions about the Mayor’s priorities and the equitable distribution of resources. This unbalanced approach to public safety budgeting has not only widened the gap between various law enforcement entities but has also significantly strained the city’s resources, forcing taxpayers to bear the brunt of mounting legal costs and compromised public safety standards.

In light of these challenges, it is imperative for city officials to prioritize the restoration of a balanced and collaborative approach to public safety funding and jail facility management. Addressing the grievances between the Mayor’s office and the Sheriff’s office, along with a comprehensive overhaul of budget allocations, is crucial to ensuring the effective functioning of the jail system and the overall well-being of all residents in San Francisco. Only through a concerted effort to bridge the gap and foster a unified approach to public safety can the city begin to mitigate the financial strain and uphold the rights and dignity of its residents.

San Francisco’s Criminal Justice System: A Balancing Act with Limited Resources and the Mayor’s Funding Failure

San Francisco’s criminal justice system is grappling with a multifaceted crisis, characterized by a significant imbalance in resource allocation, challenges in monitoring pretrial diversion and electronic monitoring, and the persistent issue of outstanding warrants. A critical element that exacerbates this problem is the Mayor’s apparent failure to adequately fund the Sheriff’s Office, which is tasked with managing these critical aspects of the criminal justice system. This article delves deeper into these issues, highlighting the impacts of inadequate funding on the functioning of the system.

A Strain on Sheriff’s Office Resources

San Francisco’s Sheriff’s Office plays a pivotal role in overseeing pretrial diversion programs, electronic monitoring, and the apprehension of individuals with outstanding warrants. However, the Sheriff’s Office has been grappling with resource shortages that severely hamper its effectiveness.

Electronic Monitoring Oversight

Perhaps one of the most glaring issues is the overwhelming caseload faced by a mere one to two deputy sheriffs per shift responsible for monitoring 500 individuals on electronic ankle monitoring. This stark imbalance between the number of offenders and the personnel assigned to oversee them has several consequences:

  1. Inadequate supervision: The limited number of personnel makes it exceedingly difficult to ensure effective supervision and compliance with the terms of electronic monitoring. This raises concerns about the potential for offenders to exploit these conditions or reoffend without proper oversight.
  2. Rehabilitation and reintegration: The objective of electronic monitoring programs, which is to support rehabilitation and successful reintegration into society, becomes questionable when the sheer caseload makes individualized attention and support nearly impossible.

The Overburdened Warrants Service Unit

The Warrants Service Unit, tasked with actively seeking out and apprehending individuals with outstanding warrants, operates with just five deputies. The implications of this understaffing are far-reaching:

  1. Limited apprehension capacity: With a minimal workforce, the unit struggles to locate and arrest individuals with outstanding warrants in a timely manner. This undermines the credibility and effectiveness of the criminal justice system.
  2. Accumulating warrants: The challenges faced by the Warrants Service Unit contribute to the mounting number of outstanding warrants, leaving many individuals unaccounted for and the public at risk.

Mayor’s Failure to Fund

2023 San Francisco budget

It is imperative to address the core issue: the Mayor’s apparent failure to allocate adequate funding to the Sheriff’s Office. This funding deficiency exacerbates the problems within the criminal justice system, resulting in an imbalanced workload for deputies, an ever-increasing number of outstanding warrants, and the erosion of public trust.

The implications of this funding shortfall are clear:

  1. Reduced public safety: Inadequate funding of the Sheriff’s Office directly impacts the safety of San Francisco’s residents. Insufficient resources hinder the effective supervision and apprehension of offenders.
  2. Strain on law enforcement: Deputies are faced with insurmountable caseloads, making it nearly impossible for them to fulfill their responsibilities effectively. This, in turn, affects the quality of rehabilitation programs and the timely apprehension of individuals with outstanding warrants.

San Francisco’s criminal justice system grapples with severe challenges, primarily due to the lack of funding for the Sheriff’s Office. The Mayor’s failure to address this issue has far-reaching consequences, leading to imbalanced workloads, a growing number of outstanding warrants, and a loss of public trust. Addressing this problem requires a fundamental reevaluation of resource allocation and a commitment to bolstering the Sheriff’s Office’s capabilities. It is crucial to bridge this funding gap to ensure that the criminal justice system can meet its core objectives while safeguarding the interests of the community.