SFPOA Publicly Shamed a Small Business

There have been numerous tax paying businesses closing up their San Francisco locations in recent years, as well as many small businesses/restaurants closing up shop. In addition, just days ago, the San Francisco Police Officers’ Association publicly criticized a small restaurant business for the actions of a new employee on social media.

The actions taken by SFPOA were an embarrassment to not only law enforcement unions, but to San Francisco as a whole. One wonders if it was appropriate to publicly shame a small business while they are struggling in the city; especially considering Police Chief Scott speaks of de-escalation and respect for the community in his training initiatives. Those on the SPOA board, including the Police Lieutenant leading the SFPOA, have received additional management and discrimination training – yet they chose to bully and publicly shame businesses. This could have been easily avoided with a simple phone call or meeting with the restaurant’s owner or manager. Posting their shaming on social media, tagging pizzaquaredsf, caused a flurry of national news releases; it is clear their intention was to spread their message far and wide.

SFPOA shames Pizzasquared

 

 

The San Francisco Police Officers Association has negatively impacted Pizza Squared in San Francisco.  This negative public shaming will negatively impact Pizza Squared’s business.  This can already be seen in negative online comments and Yelp reviews. The SFPOA operates unprofessionally, and it wasn’t necessary to post it on social media.

 

SFPOA Makes Childish Attack on SFDSA

On January 14, 2023 at 8:12 PM, the San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) made a statement that was misleading and contained falsehoods. The SFPOA claimed that the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) cannot staff the jails, but this is not true. According to mandatory guidelines, SFSO Deputy Sheriffs are required to staff the jails.  The SFSO staffs the jails on voluntary overtime or mandated overtime. The SFSO is working to increase recruitment and reduce overtime, and has made significant progress in recruiting new Deputy Sheriffs.

The SFPOA also claimed that the SFSO lacks the training required to perform their duties. This is also untrue. The SFSO has the same POST training certifications as police officers and more. The only additional training required by the California Peace Officers Standards of Training is an Aviation Security Training course, which is only a 40 hour course. The SFPOA is presenting this as a significant hurdle, but it is not.  Additional training can be easily accomplished. See our current list of training in our article “San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs are highly trained individuals.

The SFPOA also stated that the SFSO lacks the training to respond to a terrorist attack. The SFDSA strongly disagrees with this claim. In the event of a terrorist attack, the SFPD will turn to the SFSO for assistance. The SFSO has a long history of responding to large scale emergencies such as riots, the Loma Prieto Earthquake, and forest fires. The SFSO also responded to the recent COVID-19 pandemic and worked 24/7 to protect the public.

SFPOA Childish Attack with false info

 

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) has a dedicated Emergency Services Unit (ESU) that includes a Special Response Team, a Crisis Negotiation Team, and a Radio Telephone Operator Team. These teams respond to emergencies within the Department, City, and County of San Francisco, as well as mutual aid requests from other jurisdictions. The ESU also includes a Mobile Field Force (MFF) that is trained to respond to major critical incidents, including Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) devices. The MFF is led by a Platoon Commander, an Executive Officer and is divided into four squads.

The San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) has misleadingly claimed that it is not possible for Deputy Sheriffs to work at the airport. However, the SFPD arrest data at the airport is minimal, with an average of approximately 300 arrests per year, and approximately 130 SFPD officers (staffing data from 2020). Additionally, the SFPD has 27 Sergeants at the airport, which is an unusual ratio of 1 supervisor to every 5 police officers. It is clear that the level of arrests at the airport is low and it would be a misuse of City resources to have SFPD at the airport. We will provide updated data as it becomes available.

As stated on Twitter prior to the SFPOA’s misleading post, it is possible for the SFSO to staff the airport. First, we can grandfather in any PD Officer close to retirement. Second, a percentage of the police officers at the airport can return to SF to patrol. And third, the SFDSA will work with the Sheriff to create a functional staffing plan and assist with recruiting. This can be done in a phased approach, not overnight.

SFPOA Released False Info to the Public

On January 14, 2023 at 8:12 PM, the San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) released false information to the public, causing confusion and mistrust among the community. In a post on Twitter, the SFPOA attempted to dissuade the idea of Deputy Sheriffs filling police positions at the San Francisco International Airport (SFO), the Ports, and/or the Marine Unit by falsely stating that the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) is understaffed by 430 Deputy Sheriffs.  This is false, the Sheriffs Office is not understaffed by 430 Deputies.

SFPOA False Info to Public

The San Francisco Police Department is currently understaffed to the point where it has to send its investigators to patrol several days a week, this is a serious matter as it impacts public safety and criminal investigations (reported by Lou Barberini GBTBNews). The understaffing problem is a critical issue that needs to be addressed immediately.

Normally, law enforcement agencies work together and help each other to achieve the goal of public safety. However, it appears that the SFPOA is more interested in protecting their monopoly on law enforcement instead of keeping San Francisco safe. Public Safety does not appear to be a priority for the SFPOA, if it was, why are they working so hard to block Deputy Sheriffs from providing staffing relief at the SFO, Ports, or Marine Unit?

Allowing Deputy Sheriffs to take over those locations would allow the SFPD to redirect its police officers to the City to respond to emergencies and calls for service, thereby increasing public safety. It is essential that the SFPOA and the SFDSA work together to achieve the common goal of keeping San Francisco safe. The public deserves nothing less. The SFPOA must understand that their actions have consequences and they must be held accountable for their words and actions. The community deserves transparency and honesty from its law enforcement agencies. The SFPOA should be focused on finding solutions to improve public safety, rather than spreading false information and attacking their colleagues in law enforcement.

It is worth noting that SFDSA President Lomba, the man being attacked by the SFPOA, had spent Christmas Day with his family delivering hot meals to Deputy Sheriffs that spent their Christmas Holiday working to protect others. This shows the dedication and commitment of the SFDSA in ensuring public safety and the contrast with the SFPOA’s behavior.

San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs are Highly Trained Individuals

San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs are highly trained individuals who play a crucial role in maintaining law and order within the city. As 830.1 Peace officers, they have the same level of training and qualifications as a SFPD Police Officer.

The training process for a recruit deputy begins with a 6.5-month Post Certified Academy, which is currently held at the South Bay Regional Academy in San Mateo or Santa Rosa Junior College. Once the recruit graduates from the POST Academy, they must pass a four-week Board of State & Community Corrections Certified Jail Corrections Course.

SF Deputies

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office places a strong emphasis on ongoing training for their sworn staff. In addition to the 24 Hrs. of Certified POST training that must be completed biennially, all SFSO sworn staff attend an additional 24 Hrs. of certified Board of State and Community Corrections BSCC training annually. This means that San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs receive more mandated training than a police agency.

In addition to standard training, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office has trained their sworn staff on a 16 Hr. mandatory Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) which emphasizes de-escalation and situational awareness when dealing with individuals with mental disorders, developmental disabilities, and altered mental status. This training was conducted FY 2019-2020 and was again offered FY 2021-2022. Deputies also receive 4 Hrs. of Force Option Simulator Training which emphasizes situational awareness, de-escalation, and Use of Force decision making. All sworn personnel attended in FY 2019-2020 and recently attended 4 hrs. during the recent 2021-2022 cycle.

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office also has a POST certified Field Training Program (Like the SFPD) and was one of the first agencies to develop their manual to meet the new POST requirements.

In terms of investigations, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office has their own Criminal Investigations Unit staffed with trained investigators who receive the same POST Training as SFPD Investigators. All investigators have attended the 76 Hr. Robert Presley Institute of Criminal Investigation Training and 40 Hr. Behavioral Awareness Training Institute. They are trained and equipped to investigate all crimes that fall under the Sheriff’s Office jurisdiction, including non-custody felony crimes in the field.

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office also has an Emergency Services Unit (ESU) with 150 Sheriff’s Deputies assigned to it. All ESU staff are chosen after passing a written and physical exam and receive a 40-hour course that covers advanced firearms training, crowd control, building search, active shooter training, and medical rescue. ESU members receive an additional 40 Hrs. of training minimum.

San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs are highly trained individuals

The Special Response Team (SRT) is a highly trained unit within the ESU. To qualify, members must first be part of the ESU and pass a physical challenge, firearms proficiency exam, simulation exercise, written exam, and oral interview panel. Chosen members are then required to attend an 80 Hour SWAT school and receive additional monthly training.

Finally, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office has a K-9 Unit, where a K-9 Team must attend a 40 hour dog handler course. A K-9 handler must partake in 16 Hrs. of monthly training minimum to meet POST standards to maintain basic patrol and/or detection proficiency.

In conclusion, San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs are well-trained and highly qualified individuals who play a vital role in maintaining law and order within the city. They undergo rigorous training and ongoing education to ensure they are equipped to handle any situation that arises.

OPEN LETTER TO SFPD CHIEF SCOTT – CURRENT STATE OF SFPD

Dear Chief Scott,

I am writing to express my concern about the current state of the San Francisco Police Department and to offer a potential solution to improve efficiency and increase police staffing.

As you are aware, the police department is facing mass retirements and is currently understaffed. This is a major issue, as it leaves our city vulnerable to increased crime and puts an undue burden on the remaining officers who are trying to do their best to serve and protect the community.

In order to address this issue, I believe it would be beneficial to reduce the size of the police department and turn over some functions, such as the SFO, to the San Francisco Sheriff. By reassessing the roles and responsibilities of the department, we can redirect resources towards increasing the number of police officers in San Francisco, particularly in high-need areas like the Tenderloin district.

I understand that such a change would require careful consideration and planning, but I believe it is a common sense solution that would ultimately improve public safety for San Franciscans. By streamlining the department and focusing on core functions, we can ensure that your SFPD officers are able to do their jobs more effectively and efficiently.

I also believe that turning over auxiliary functions, such as the SFO, marine unit, and port patrols, to the Sheriff’s Department makes sense. The Sheriff’s Department is equipped to handle these types of tasks, and it would free up additional resources for the SFPD to focus on crime reduction and public safety in the city.

Given the current state of public safety in San Francisco, we have concerns for the well-being of our union members who reside in the city.  I hope that you will seriously consider this proposal and take any necessary steps to make it a reality. As the leader of the SFPD, it is your responsibility to ensure that the department is functioning at its best and that our city is as safe as possible. I believe that implementing these changes would be a step in the right direction towards achieving that goal.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

Ken Lomba
SFDSA President
415-696-2428

SF Police Chief Scott Says Staffing Shortage But Still Assigns SF Police to SFO

San Francisco Police Chief Scott has been all over the newspaper advocating he has a police staffing shortage.  But is he doing everything to balance his staffing to improve public safety in San Francisco.  

Chief Scott stated the San Francisco Police Department is short 400 police officers and that if he increases police in San Francisco it will reduce crime.  What about all the police officers he has assigned to the San Francisco Airport which is located over 10 miles South of San Francisco in San Mateo County?  Why doesn’t he return some of them to SF?  As flights increase at SFO, the airport will demand more police.  Will Chief Scott continue to send his experienced police officers to SFO?  This is such an inefficient practice.

Chief Scott can contact San Francisco Sheriff Paul Miyamoto and create a joint effort at the SFO with both SF Police Officers and SF Deputy Sheriffs.  This would relieve the stress on SFPD for staffing the airport.  The airport can be supplemented with both police and sheriffs.  By doing this, Chief Scott can focus on his mission and responsibility which is the City of San Francisco.

Chief Scott wants more police but will he continue the same old practice of assigning his most experienced and trained police officers over 10 miles away at the SFO in a different county or will he do something efficient and bring in the SF Sheriffs to assist him with the airport staffing needs so his police officers can work in San Francisco?

We have a better way.  Send in the Sheriffs.  Please read this research report on “Bringing San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to the San Francisco Airport: An Opportunity For An Efficient And Practical Change.”


 

 

SFDSA receives 2018 Gold Seal of Transparency from GuideStar

SFDSA Gold SealSan Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association was recently recognized for our transparency with a 2018 Gold Seal on our GuideStar Nonprofit Profile!

GuideStar is the world’s largest source of information on nonprofit organizations. More than 8 million visitors per year and a network of 200+ partners use GuideStar data to grow support for nonprofits.   In order to get the 2018 Gold Seal, San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association shared important information with the public using our profile on www.guidestar.org. 

Now our community members and potential donors can find in-depth information about our goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress. We’re shining a spotlight on the difference we help make in the world.

Check out our GuideStar Nonprofit Profile and tell us what you think:  https://www.guidestar.org/profile/94-2838370

San Francisco Deputy Sheriff stops Robbery Attempt near City Hall

In June of 2015, an attempted robbery was thwarted by a quick-acting San Francisco Sr. Deputy Sheriff V. Chew when he observed a subject fleeing and others giving chase several blocks from the scene of a robbery.

The robbery, unbeknownst to Sr. Deputy Chew, originated outside the Civic Center headquarters of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Sr. Deputy Chew, who was driving in an unmarked vehicle, was able to catch up to and detain the subject. Kudos to Sr. Deputy Chew!

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Department (SFSD), officially the City and County of San Francisco Sheriff’s Department, is the sheriff’s department for the City and County of San Francisco. The department has 850 deputized personnel, and support staff.

The primary function of the SFSD is to operate the system of county jails where there is an average population of 1,200 inmates, and a number of individuals on supervised release programs.

The SFSD also provides law enforcement and security services in the following locations in San Francisco:

  • the civil and criminal courts
  • City Hall
  • the Emergency Communications & Dispatch center
  • Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, Laguna Honda Hospital, the Public Utilities Commission, the MTA  and several public health clinics

The current sheriff is Vicki Hennessy, the first female sheriff in the city-county (and the second in the nine-county Bay Area, after Virginia Clark of nearby Santa Clara County, as well as the fifth female sheriff in California, joining Margaret Mims [Fresno County], Laurie Craig [Glenn County] and Sandra Hutchens [Orange County]).

The SFSD is a separate organization from the San Francisco Police Department. However, SFSD deputies and SFPD officers have all attended a POST-mandated police academy, and are duly sworn California peace officers enforcing state laws and San Francisco Municipal Ordinances.