San Francisco’s Betrayal: City Offers $53 Incentive to Keep Deputy Sheriffs

In a shocking turn of events, the City and County of San Francisco has revealed its true colors in the latest contract negotiations with Deputy Sheriffs. Despite years of dedicated service and sacrifice, Deputy Sheriffs are being offered a meager 1% longevity incentive if they continue to work past 20 years.

This offer is not just insulting; it’s a blatant disregard for the safety and security of San Francisco’s residents. While Deputy Sheriffs are offered a mere $53 per paycheck to delay their well-deserved retirement, the City has shown a stark contrast in its treatment of other departments.

In 2023, Dispatchers were given a 5% longevity incentive, totaling over $1.5 million distributed to eligible dispatchers, to retain them from retiring. The police department fared even better, with an additional 13% in longevity incentives, totaling a staggering $65.85 million distributed to eligible officers.

With 160 Deputy Sheriffs eligible to retire this year after dedicating at least 20 years of their lives to serving and protecting the City, the City’s offer is not just a slap in the face; it’s a betrayal of trust. It sends a clear message that the City does not value the contributions and sacrifices of Deputy Sheriffs.

Moreover, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) is facing a severe staffing shortage, currently short-staffed by -178 deputy sheriffs. This shortage has led to overworking of Deputy Sheriffs with forced overtime, putting additional strain on an already taxed workforce.

Adding to the problem is San Francisco’s notoriously long and slow hiring process. What will San Francisco do when $53 dollars a paycheck does not retain Deputy Sheriffs from retiring? The consequences could be catastrophic. The courts could come to a grinding halt, jails could become out of control, inmates and employees would be at risk, and there would be fewer deputies on the streets for public safety. The entire system could collapse under the weight of these challenges.

It’s time for the City to wake up and recognize the dedication and commitment of Deputy Sheriffs. They deserve a fair and respectful longevity incentive that reflects their years of service and ensures the continued safety of San Francisco. Anything less is a disgraceful betrayal of those who put their lives on the line every day to keep our city safe.

 

Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation: Addressing San Francisco’s Illegal Drug Use Problem

In recent years, San Francisco has faced a growing challenge with illegal drug use, particularly with highly addictive and deadly substances like “tranq” Xylazine and Fentanyl. These drugs have contributed to an alarming number of drug overdose deaths, highlighting the urgent need for effective interventions to address this public health crisis. As the city seeks solutions, one approach gaining attention is the concept of Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation. This method involves providing rehabilitation programs within the criminal justice system, utilizing the resources of the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) to offer a controlled environment for individuals with substance use disorders to receive treatment and support.

 

Tranq Zombie Drug

 

The key to this approach lies in recognizing the intertwined nature of substance abuse and criminal behavior. Many individuals who engage in illegal drug use find themselves caught in a cycle of addiction and criminal activity, often leading to incarceration. Traditional punitive measures, such as imprisonment without addressing the underlying issues, have proven ineffective in breaking this cycle. Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation seeks to address both the criminal behavior and the root cause of substance abuse through a comprehensive program.

The SFSO plays a central role in this approach by leveraging its resources and expertise to create an environment conducive to rehabilitation. Deputy Sheriffs, who are already responsible for maintaining order and security within jail facilities, can be trained to provide support and guidance to individuals with substance use disorders. By working closely with trained professionals, participants in the program can access a range of services tailored to their needs, including counseling, medical treatment, and vocational training.

One of the key advantages of Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation is its ability to provide a structured and supervised environment for individuals to address their substance abuse issues. Unlike traditional treatment programs that rely on voluntary participation, this approach offers a more controlled setting where participants are encouraged to engage in treatment and are held accountable for their progress. By integrating rehabilitation into the criminal justice system, the program can also ensure that individuals receive the support they need while serving their sentences, increasing the likelihood of successful reintegration into society upon release.

Moreover, Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation can be a cost-effective solution for San Francisco. By addressing substance abuse issues within the criminal justice system, the program has the potential to reduce recidivism rates, leading to long-term savings associated with lower incarceration and criminal justice costs. Additionally, by breaking the cycle of addiction and criminal behavior, the program can contribute to a safer and healthier community, benefiting the city as a whole.

Importantly, this system is designed not only to address the substance abuse issues but also to attend to the overall well-being of the individuals in the program. Participants will have access to healthcare, including medical and mental health services, to address any underlying health conditions or mental health needs. They will also receive clean clothing, access to bathing facilities, and a clean environment, promoting hygiene and overall health. Deputy Sheriffs will ensure their safety, creating a secure environment conducive to recovery.

Given the grave risks associated with drugs like “tranq” Xylazine and Fentanyl, providing a comprehensive program like Incarceration-Based Rehabilitation is crucial for keeping individuals alive and getting them on the path to recovery. By offering a holistic approach that addresses both the substance abuse issues and the broader needs of the individuals, this system has the potential to make a significant impact on the lives of those struggling with addiction in San Francisco. Will San Francisco value human life and do this to stop the cycle of addiction and overdose deaths? 

URGENT – Disturbing Default on Payment by San Francisco: A Christmas Crisis for Deputy Sheriffs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

URGENT – Disturbing Default on Payment by the City and County of San Francisco: A Christmas Crisis for Deputy Sheriffs

San Francisco Grinch

 

San Francisco, December 9, 2023 – In a dire development, the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) grapples with severe financial turbulence, defaulting on an outstanding debt of $74,376.73 owed to 70 Deputy Sheriffs. This disconcerting situation is compounded by Moody’s recent revision of its rating outlook to negative from stable, prompting an urgent response from concerned parties.

This default, stemming from contract violations related to the non-payment of Watch Commanders, has not only breached trust but also jeopardized public safety. Recent polling indicates that public safety is the number one priority for San Francisco voters, emphasizing the critical role law enforcement officers play in maintaining community well-being.

Since May 2023, an additional $94,675.00 owed to deputies for increased workload due to understaffing at the Sheriff’s Office remains unpaid. This alarming default not only raises financial concerns but also questions how San Francisco intends to attract and retain Deputy Sheriffs while maintaining high morale.  San Francisco owes a total of $169,051.73 to Deputy Sheriffs and has not paid it.

As the holiday season approaches, San Francisco risks becoming the Grinch that stole Christmas from its very own deputy sheriffs by withholding the payment owed to them. This act of financial neglect not only casts a shadow over the festive season but also raises ethical questions about the city’s commitment to the well-being of its law enforcement officers.

Public safety, a paramount concern for San Francisco voters, is at risk due to the city’s failure to honor financial commitments to its law enforcement officers. This breach of trust not only undermines the dedication of these officers but also poses a threat to the overall well-being of the community.

Efforts to address these issues with relevant authorities have proven futile, necessitating the escalation of this matter to Moody’s Investor Services. The recent revision in Moody’s rating outlook to negative underscores the severity of the financial challenges faced by CCSF. The City’s inability to meet its financial commitments raises concerns not only about its overall creditworthiness but also about its ability to prioritize public safety.

In a letter addressed to Moody’s Investor Services, the undersigned parties express profound disappointment and urgency, urging an in-depth examination of CCSF’s financial standing. The gravity of the defaults, coupled with the negative revision in rating outlook, demands a comprehensive evaluation of the municipality’s creditworthiness.

The undersigned parties remain resolute in navigating these tumultuous waters, seeking transparency, accountability, and immediate corrective action from the City and County of San Francisco to safeguard public safety and uphold the morale of its dedicated law enforcement officers during this holiday season.

A letter demanding urgent payment for the city’s breach of payment was sent to Mayor London Breed and all members of the Board of Supervisors by the SFDSA.

For media inquiries, please contact:

Ken Lomba
SFDSA President
415-696-2428

 

Mayor London Breed’s Strained Relations with Sheriffs Fuel Taxpayer Costs and Public Safety Imbalance in San Francisco

Mayor London Breed’s contentious relationship with the Sheriff’s office in San Francisco has not only sparked a series of lawsuits but has also triggered a financial burden on taxpayers, amplifying concerns about public safety and the welfare of incarcerated people within the county jails. The repercussions of Mayor Breed’s alleged hostility towards the Sheriffs have become increasingly evident, as budget cuts and staffing shortages have resulted in deteriorating jail conditions, mounting legal battles, and a glaring imbalance in the city’s public safety funding.

The degrading conditions within the county jails have prompted a wave of lawsuits filed by prisoners, highlighting the pervasive issues of poor living standards, compromised safety measures, and the absence of adequate healthcare provisions. These legal actions underscore the distressing impact of the Mayor’s purported animosity towards the Sheriff’s office, revealing a systemic neglect of fundamental human rights and a failure to uphold the basic standards of inmate welfare.

Compounding these concerns, the chronic understaffing of deputy sheriffs has not only jeopardized the safety of law enforcement personnel but has also significantly hindered the Sheriff’s office’s ability to ensure the well-being and security of incarcerated people. With the Mayor’s persistent cuts to the Sheriff’s budget, the hiring process has slowed down, at times even halting, exacerbating the strain on an already burdened system and amplifying the risks faced by both inmates and deputies.

 

As a result of these troubling circumstances, the city has faced mounting legal fees and settlements, as lawsuits filed by inmates continue to surface, with many resulting in successful verdicts against the city administration. The financial implications of these legal battles have created a substantial burden on taxpayers, underscoring the urgent need for a comprehensive reassessment of the city’s approach to public safety funding and correctional facility management.

Furthermore, the stark contrast in budgetary allocations, with the Sheriff’s office facing funding cuts while the police and fire departments enjoy increased financial support, has raised questions about the Mayor’s priorities and the equitable distribution of resources. This unbalanced approach to public safety budgeting has not only widened the gap between various law enforcement entities but has also significantly strained the city’s resources, forcing taxpayers to bear the brunt of mounting legal costs and compromised public safety standards.

In light of these challenges, it is imperative for city officials to prioritize the restoration of a balanced and collaborative approach to public safety funding and jail facility management. Addressing the grievances between the Mayor’s office and the Sheriff’s office, along with a comprehensive overhaul of budget allocations, is crucial to ensuring the effective functioning of the jail system and the overall well-being of all residents in San Francisco. Only through a concerted effort to bridge the gap and foster a unified approach to public safety can the city begin to mitigate the financial strain and uphold the rights and dignity of its residents.

San Francisco’s Criminal Justice System: A Balancing Act with Limited Resources and the Mayor’s Funding Failure

San Francisco’s criminal justice system is grappling with a multifaceted crisis, characterized by a significant imbalance in resource allocation, challenges in monitoring pretrial diversion and electronic monitoring, and the persistent issue of outstanding warrants. A critical element that exacerbates this problem is the Mayor’s apparent failure to adequately fund the Sheriff’s Office, which is tasked with managing these critical aspects of the criminal justice system. This article delves deeper into these issues, highlighting the impacts of inadequate funding on the functioning of the system.

A Strain on Sheriff’s Office Resources

San Francisco’s Sheriff’s Office plays a pivotal role in overseeing pretrial diversion programs, electronic monitoring, and the apprehension of individuals with outstanding warrants. However, the Sheriff’s Office has been grappling with resource shortages that severely hamper its effectiveness.

Electronic Monitoring Oversight

Perhaps one of the most glaring issues is the overwhelming caseload faced by a mere one to two deputy sheriffs per shift responsible for monitoring 500 individuals on electronic ankle monitoring. This stark imbalance between the number of offenders and the personnel assigned to oversee them has several consequences:

  1. Inadequate supervision: The limited number of personnel makes it exceedingly difficult to ensure effective supervision and compliance with the terms of electronic monitoring. This raises concerns about the potential for offenders to exploit these conditions or reoffend without proper oversight.
  2. Rehabilitation and reintegration: The objective of electronic monitoring programs, which is to support rehabilitation and successful reintegration into society, becomes questionable when the sheer caseload makes individualized attention and support nearly impossible.

The Overburdened Warrants Service Unit

The Warrants Service Unit, tasked with actively seeking out and apprehending individuals with outstanding warrants, operates with just five deputies. The implications of this understaffing are far-reaching:

  1. Limited apprehension capacity: With a minimal workforce, the unit struggles to locate and arrest individuals with outstanding warrants in a timely manner. This undermines the credibility and effectiveness of the criminal justice system.
  2. Accumulating warrants: The challenges faced by the Warrants Service Unit contribute to the mounting number of outstanding warrants, leaving many individuals unaccounted for and the public at risk.

Mayor’s Failure to Fund

2023 San Francisco budget

It is imperative to address the core issue: the Mayor’s apparent failure to allocate adequate funding to the Sheriff’s Office. This funding deficiency exacerbates the problems within the criminal justice system, resulting in an imbalanced workload for deputies, an ever-increasing number of outstanding warrants, and the erosion of public trust.

The implications of this funding shortfall are clear:

  1. Reduced public safety: Inadequate funding of the Sheriff’s Office directly impacts the safety of San Francisco’s residents. Insufficient resources hinder the effective supervision and apprehension of offenders.
  2. Strain on law enforcement: Deputies are faced with insurmountable caseloads, making it nearly impossible for them to fulfill their responsibilities effectively. This, in turn, affects the quality of rehabilitation programs and the timely apprehension of individuals with outstanding warrants.

San Francisco’s criminal justice system grapples with severe challenges, primarily due to the lack of funding for the Sheriff’s Office. The Mayor’s failure to address this issue has far-reaching consequences, leading to imbalanced workloads, a growing number of outstanding warrants, and a loss of public trust. Addressing this problem requires a fundamental reevaluation of resource allocation and a commitment to bolstering the Sheriff’s Office’s capabilities. It is crucial to bridge this funding gap to ensure that the criminal justice system can meet its core objectives while safeguarding the interests of the community.

San Francisco Sheriff’s Office Takes Bold Action as Mayor Breed’s Strategies Fall Short in Drug Crisis

In a stunning turn of events, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office has emerged as the driving force in the fight against the escalating drug crisis, as Mayor London Breed’s strategies continue to fall short. With the city grappling with drug-related issues, Sheriff Paul Miyamoto has taken decisive action, unveiling a courageous plan to deploy 130 additional deputies to the troubled Tenderloin and South of Market (SoMa) neighborhoods.

SF Sheriff Tenderloin Initiative
SF Sheriff Tenderloin Initiative

While Mayor Breed’s approach has faced criticism for its ineffectiveness, Sheriff Miyamoto has stepped up to lead the charge in tackling the deep-rooted drug problem. With resolute determination, the Sheriff’s Office has presented a comprehensive strategy to address drug dealers and individuals openly using drugs in public. The deployment of additional deputies, starting this month, signifies a seismic shift in the battle against crime and substance abuse.

Sheriff Miyamoto, flanked by concerned citizens and law enforcement officials, announced this groundbreaking initiative outside City Hall. With unwavering resolve, he highlighted the urgent need for effective action in combating the city’s drug crisis. The Sheriff’s Office, guided by a steadfast commitment to public safety, is now taking the reins in the quest to find real solutions.

While the Sheriff’s Office courageously assumes a leading role, it is no secret that Mayor Breed’s strategies have fallen short of expectations. The current approach has been marred by limited success and persistent challenges. Public health experts have long decried the idea of relying on incarceration and criminalization as effective means to address substance abuse disorders.


However, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office’s proactive stance offers hope for a different path forward. By increasing law enforcement presence and targeting drug-related offenses, they aim to restore order and offer a helping hand to those struggling with addiction. The Sheriff’s Office’s unwavering dedication to the community’s well-being is a testament to their commitment to creating lasting change.

Nevertheless, significant hurdles remain in this uphill battle. Both the San Francisco Police Department and the Sheriff’s Office confront staffing shortages that hinder their ability to effectively address the city’s safety concerns. Police Chief Bill Scott emphasized the importance of receiving adequate funding and support from elected officials to overcome these challenges. The commitment of city leaders to address staffing issues will be crucial in achieving tangible progress.

As the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office takes bold strides in confronting the drug crisis, it is evident that their approach stands in stark contrast to Mayor Breed’s faltering strategies. With their specialized training and unwavering dedication, the Sheriff’s Office deputies will fearlessly patrol the streets, tackling criminal elements head-on and extending a lifeline to those lost in the grips of addiction.

While the Sheriff’s Office shoulders the burden of this monumental task, it is vital for the community to rally behind them. Together, we can bring about meaningful change, ensuring a safer and healthier future for San Francisco. Let us unite in support of the determined men and women of the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office as they lead the charge to reshape our city’s destiny in the face of a daunting drug crisis.

Mayor London Breed’s Covert Defunding Tactics: Undermining the Sheriff’s Department

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mayor London Breed’s strategic defunding of the Sheriff’s Department in San Francisco has ignited concerns among law enforcement officials and citizens alike. Operating under the radar, these silent defunding measures, such as the denial of the longevity incentive proposal on May 15th, 2023, and disproportionate budget cuts, are adversely impacting the department’s staffing levels and compromising public safety. Let’s examine these covert actions and their potential ramifications on the Sheriff’s Department.

Denial of Longevity Incentive Proposal

One glaring example of Mayor Breed’s covert defunding strategy is the denial of the longevity incentive proposal. On May 15th, 2023, Mayor Breed rejected this proposal aimed at retaining experienced deputies eligible for retirement, and she also failed to come to the table with a counter proposal or offer any alternative ideas to address the issue. This lack of engagement and proactive effort from the mayor demonstrates a concerning disregard for the retention of deputy sheriffs and exacerbates the ongoing staffing crisis within the Sheriff’s Department. The loss of 50 to 110 deputies due to early retirement further strains the department, leading to increased workloads, reduced efficiency, and compromised public safety.

Budget Cuts and Disproportionate Allocation

Mayor Breed’s budget decisions further illustrate her covert defunding tactics. While slashing the Sheriff’s Department budget by 3%, the mayor simultaneously increased the budgets of other public safety departments, such as the police by 9% and the fire department by 3%. This disproportionate allocation sends a troubling message about the mayor’s priorities and undermines the Sheriff’s Department’s ability to effectively carry out its duties.

Unused Funds and Overtime Reduction

The mayor’s claim of utilizing unused funds from vacant positions and reducing overtime within the Sheriff’s Office raises questions about the allocation of resources. If these funds were available, they could have been redirected to support initiatives like the longevity incentive proposal, thereby mitigating staffing shortages and reducing the need for overtime. However, the failure to do so implies a disregard for the long-term sustainability of the department and places an unnecessary burden on the existing workforce.

Implications for Public Safety and Financial Efficiency

The consequences of Mayor Breed’s covert defunding tactics extend beyond understaffing. Insufficient staffing levels compromise response times, limit the department’s ability to proactively address emerging challenges, and hinder the delivery of essential services to the community. Moreover, the reliance on overtime to fill vacant positions not only strains the budget but also places an additional burden on the dedicated deputies who shoulder the increased workload.

A Call for Accountability and Transparency

In light of these concerning developments, it is crucial for concerned citizens, deputies, and community stakeholders to hold Mayor London Breed accountable for her silent defunding strategies. The Sheriff’s Department plays a vital role in maintaining public safety, and it deserves the necessary resources and support to fulfill its duties effectively.

Additionally, transparency and open dialogue are imperative in addressing these budgetary concerns. Citizens must demand clear explanations and justifications for the disproportionate budget cuts and the denial of proposals aimed at retaining experienced deputies. By fostering transparency, the community can actively participate in shaping a fair and effective criminal justice system that prioritizes public safety.

Mayor London Breed’s covert defunding tactics targeting the Sheriff’s Department in San Francisco have serious implications for public safety and the well-being of the community. The denial of the longevity incentive proposal on May 15th, 2023, without offering any alternative solutions, and the disproportionate budget cuts jeopardize the department’s staffing levels, hindering its ability to maintain law and order effectively. It is essential for citizens and stakeholders to voice their concerns, demand accountability, and advocate for the allocation of resources that align with the department’s needs. Only through open dialogue and collaborative efforts can we ensure a robust and secure future for the Sheriff’s Department and the community it serves. By holding Mayor Breed accountable for her silent defunding strategies, we can work towards a fair and effective criminal justice system that prioritizes public safety and upholds the principles of justice and equality.

 

Media Contact:

Ken Lomba
President
San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association
415-696-2428

SFPOA’s “SFO Training” Debunked

The San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) has recently raised concerns on Twitter about advanced officer training requirements for San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to work at the city’s airport, SFO. However, upon closer examination, it is clear that the training in question is not as difficult or time-consuming as the SFPOA suggests.

SFO Airport Police

The “training” referred to by the San Francisco Police Officer Association is the California POST Aviation Security Training, a one-week, 40-hour course available to all law enforcement officers, not just the SFPD. The course covers the history of aviation security, introduction to the airport environment, criminal threat to the aviation industry, agencies and jurisdictions involved in airport security (such as the TSA, FBI, CBP, and USSS), legal aspects of aviation security, and the responsibilities of law enforcement officers working in an airport setting.

This training is not particularly difficult, and can easily be completed by San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to meet the requirement to work at SFO. By allowing the SFPD to shift some of the police officers currently working at the airport back to the city, it will alleviate the staffing pressures on the SFPD and allow for a more efficient use of resources.

One solution is to grandfather in any SFPD officers close to retirement at the airport, and then work with the Sheriff to create a phased staffing plan that would allow for a percentage of police officers at the airport to return to SF to patrol in the City. This phased approach would ensure a smooth transition and allow for adequate staffing at the airport while also relieving pressure on the SFPD.

In conclusion, the minimum training requirements for San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to work at SFO are not as difficult or time-consuming as the SFPOA suggests. By allowing the SFPD to shift some of its officers back to the city, it will alleviate staffing pressures and allow for a more efficient use of resources. The SFDSA will work with the Sheriff to create a functional staffing plan and assist with recruiting to ensure a smooth transition.

San Francisco Deputies help SFPD with CHP Attempted Murder Suspect

On February 2, 2016, while driving patrol for the San Francisco Sheriff’s Patrol Division, Sr. Deputy M. Clauzel and Deputy M. Li responded to a radio call that a CHP officer had been stabbed.

They first advised the SFSD’s Operation Center at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital to clear a path for an ambulance for the wounded officer Continue reading “San Francisco Deputies help SFPD with CHP Attempted Murder Suspect”

San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs Station Transfer Unit

On July 21st, 2014 San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs conducted a 6 month station transport trail picking up prisoners from the police stations and transporting them to the San Francisco Sheriffs Department for criminal booking.  This is how it worked, when one of the officers at the Tenderloin Police Station makes an arrest, one of San Francisco’s most active police stations is down an officer. That’s because it can take up to two hours for the officer to drive a prisoner to the Hall of Justice and process them. Continue reading “San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs Station Transfer Unit”