SFPOA’s “SFO Training” Debunked

The San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) has recently raised concerns on Twitter about advanced officer training requirements for San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to work at the city’s airport, SFO. However, upon closer examination, it is clear that the training in question is not as difficult or time-consuming as the SFPOA suggests.

SFO Airport Police

The “training” referred to by the San Francisco Police Officer Association is the California POST Aviation Security Training, a one-week, 40-hour course available to all law enforcement officers, not just the SFPD. The course covers the history of aviation security, introduction to the airport environment, criminal threat to the aviation industry, agencies and jurisdictions involved in airport security (such as the TSA, FBI, CBP, and USSS), legal aspects of aviation security, and the responsibilities of law enforcement officers working in an airport setting.

This training is not particularly difficult, and can easily be completed by San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to meet the requirement to work at SFO. By allowing the SFPD to shift some of the police officers currently working at the airport back to the city, it will alleviate the staffing pressures on the SFPD and allow for a more efficient use of resources.

One solution is to grandfather in any SFPD officers close to retirement at the airport, and then work with the Sheriff to create a phased staffing plan that would allow for a percentage of police officers at the airport to return to SF to patrol in the City. This phased approach would ensure a smooth transition and allow for adequate staffing at the airport while also relieving pressure on the SFPD.

In conclusion, the minimum training requirements for San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to work at SFO are not as difficult or time-consuming as the SFPOA suggests. By allowing the SFPD to shift some of its officers back to the city, it will alleviate staffing pressures and allow for a more efficient use of resources. The SFDSA will work with the Sheriff to create a functional staffing plan and assist with recruiting to ensure a smooth transition.

SFPOA Makes Childish Attack on SFDSA

On January 14, 2023 at 8:12 PM, the San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) made a statement that was misleading and contained falsehoods. The SFPOA claimed that the San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) cannot staff the jails, but this is not true. According to mandatory guidelines, SFSO Deputy Sheriffs are required to staff the jails.  The SFSO staffs the jails on voluntary overtime or mandated overtime. The SFSO is working to increase recruitment and reduce overtime, and has made significant progress in recruiting new Deputy Sheriffs.

The SFPOA also claimed that the SFSO lacks the training required to perform their duties. This is also untrue. The SFSO has the same POST training certifications as police officers and more. The only additional training required by the California Peace Officers Standards of Training is an Aviation Security Training course, which is only a 40 hour course. The SFPOA is presenting this as a significant hurdle, but it is not.  Additional training can be easily accomplished. See our current list of training in our article “San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs are highly trained individuals.

The SFPOA also stated that the SFSO lacks the training to respond to a terrorist attack. The SFDSA strongly disagrees with this claim. In the event of a terrorist attack, the SFPD will turn to the SFSO for assistance. The SFSO has a long history of responding to large scale emergencies such as riots, the Loma Prieto Earthquake, and forest fires. The SFSO also responded to the recent COVID-19 pandemic and worked 24/7 to protect the public.

SFPOA Childish Attack with false info

 

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office (SFSO) has a dedicated Emergency Services Unit (ESU) that includes a Special Response Team, a Crisis Negotiation Team, and a Radio Telephone Operator Team. These teams respond to emergencies within the Department, City, and County of San Francisco, as well as mutual aid requests from other jurisdictions. The ESU also includes a Mobile Field Force (MFF) that is trained to respond to major critical incidents, including Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) devices. The MFF is led by a Platoon Commander, an Executive Officer and is divided into four squads.

The San Francisco Police Officers Association (SFPOA) has misleadingly claimed that it is not possible for Deputy Sheriffs to work at the airport. However, the SFPD arrest data at the airport is minimal, with an average of approximately 300 arrests per year, and approximately 130 SFPD officers (staffing data from 2020). Additionally, the SFPD has 27 Sergeants at the airport, which is an unusual ratio of 1 supervisor to every 5 police officers. It is clear that the level of arrests at the airport is low and it would be a misuse of City resources to have SFPD at the airport. We will provide updated data as it becomes available.

As stated on Twitter prior to the SFPOA’s misleading post, it is possible for the SFSO to staff the airport. First, we can grandfather in any PD Officer close to retirement. Second, a percentage of the police officers at the airport can return to SF to patrol. And third, the SFDSA will work with the Sheriff to create a functional staffing plan and assist with recruiting. This can be done in a phased approach, not overnight.

SF Police Chief Scott Says Staffing Shortage But Still Assigns SF Police to SFO

San Francisco Police Chief Scott has been all over the newspaper advocating he has a police staffing shortage.  But is he doing everything to balance his staffing to improve public safety in San Francisco.  

Chief Scott stated the San Francisco Police Department is short 400 police officers and that if he increases police in San Francisco it will reduce crime.  What about all the police officers he has assigned to the San Francisco Airport which is located over 10 miles South of San Francisco in San Mateo County?  Why doesn’t he return some of them to SF?  As flights increase at SFO, the airport will demand more police.  Will Chief Scott continue to send his experienced police officers to SFO?  This is such an inefficient practice.

Chief Scott can contact San Francisco Sheriff Paul Miyamoto and create a joint effort at the SFO with both SF Police Officers and SF Deputy Sheriffs.  This would relieve the stress on SFPD for staffing the airport.  The airport can be supplemented with both police and sheriffs.  By doing this, Chief Scott can focus on his mission and responsibility which is the City of San Francisco.

Chief Scott wants more police but will he continue the same old practice of assigning his most experienced and trained police officers over 10 miles away at the SFO in a different county or will he do something efficient and bring in the SF Sheriffs to assist him with the airport staffing needs so his police officers can work in San Francisco?

We have a better way.  Send in the Sheriffs.  Please read this research report on “Bringing San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs to the San Francisco Airport: An Opportunity For An Efficient And Practical Change.”


 

 

SFPD at SFO should be redeployed to the Tenderloin

SF Deputy Sheriffs replacing SF Police Officers at the San Francisco International Airport (SFO) would save the City’s general fund by deploying over 200 police officers from San Francisco International Airport (SFO) to vacant police officer positions within the City. The initial savings would be 31 million dollars, as indicated in the Budget Legislative Analysis report.

Reallocating some or all of the SFPD resources currently devoted to this low crime area (SFO) to the higher crime areas of the City, like the Tenderloin has obvious benefits. Access to these additional officers for quality  investigation of the significant crimes within San Francisco, would protect residents and serve as a fiscal savings in the overall budget.  Foot patrols and a larger SFPD presence in areas that attract tourists would provide for a safer experience for the citizens and visitors in San Francisco.  In turn, the problems facing our tourist industry and revenues that flow from them will likely improve significantly.  

We conducted a survey to see what the voters thought of this idea. 80% percent support the idea of SFSO replacing the SFPD at SFO.

The San Francisco Sheriff’s Office specializes in addressing the law enforcement needs of government buildings and provides an excellent professional alternative to the San Francisco Police Department.  The San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs’ Association urges you to consider, support and implement a phased plan to replace some or all of the law enforcement duties with the SFSO deputies at the San Francisco Airport.